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Moe Tucker, the Tea Party, and why right-wing rockers are more common than you think

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  • Last updated: Thursday, 7 October 2010 at 1:11 pm

maureen tucker Moe Tucker, the Tea Party, and why right wing rockers are more common than you thinkDoes it matter that Moe Tucker – formerly the ultra-hip stand-up drummer with counter-culture legends The Velvet Underground – is now a supporter of shrill right-wing agitators The Tea Party?
Is it shocking that such a one-time icon of druggy cool should parrot extremist views, shrieking gibberish like this: “I’m furious at the way we’re being led towards socialism”. And this: “I have come to believe… that Obama’s plan is to destroy America from within.”

The internet certainly thinks so. Tucker has been crucified by bloggers. And you can see why. Instinctively, the soul shudders at the thought of a right-wing rock star. That’s because music is, broadly speaking, a communal experience. Rock n’roll is a radically democratic art form. Anyone can do it.

“Nobody wins, unless everybody wins”: Bruce Springsteen used to growl that at stadium gigs in the 80s, before launching into Born To Run. It’s a good line. Conversely, being right-wing is all about individualism: this is MY money, My country, and I won’t share it.

Then again, is the philosophy of “every man for himself” so antithetical to the notion of the rich rock star? In truth, many musicians turn conservative once they’ve made their millions. Some even start out that way. And not all of them are hideous bigots. Here’s a rundown of right-wing rockers:

50 Cent
Displaying the insight and wit that have made him beloved the world over, Fiddy once told GQ he thought George W Bush was “incredible… a gangsta.” We’re sure he meant shyster.

Ted Nugent
The all-American classic-rocker once published a book, God, Guns And Rock n Roll, and seriously considered running against Barack Obama in the 2004 Illinois Senate Race. The way the political sands are shifting, if he ran now, he’d probably win by a landslide.

Ian Curtis
The Joy Division singer voted for Margaret Thatcher’s Conservative government in 1979. Then again, he was hardly alone: his home town of Macclesfield has been a Tory safe seat since the Second World War.

Johnny Ramone
“God bless President Bush, and God bless America,” declared the Ramones guitarist at the band’s induction into the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame in 2002. The ensuing applause was not exactly tumultuous.

Joe Perry
The Aerosmith said in 2008 that he’d been a “hardcore Republican” his whole life. Wonder how he squared that with his alleged Olympian drug intake in the 70s.

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  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Colin-Paylor/564297607 Colin Paylor

    WHAT DO POP STARS KNOW ABOUT POLITICS
    AND WHAT DO POLITICIANS KNOW ABOUT POP MUSIC

  • Melville2010

    Yes let’s list the rock ‘n’ roll racists too – they are plenty of them and they are growing – and listening to Stanley Rd won’t stop them.


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