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The most expensive places to buy a house in England and Wales

Alex Johnson

97f556113fc1978f94b4d884d35f0d908ad775ef 300x213 The most expensive places to buy a house in England and WalesRather unsurprisingly, the most expensive residential streets in England are in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea, according to latest research from Lloyds TSB.

Close to fashionable shops and top end restaurants, Egerton Crescent (pictured) is the most expensive residential street in England and Wales with an average property value of over £8 million (£8,136,000). Some of the other expensive streets in the Royal Borough include Campden Hill Crescent with an average property price of £4,863,000, Blenheim Crescent (£4,728,000), Lansdowne Road (£4,693,000), Drayton Gardens (£4,428,000) and Eaton Square (£4,391,000).

Parkside in Merton, South West London, is the nation’s second most valuable address with an average house price of £5,161,000. Home Park Road, also in Merton, is the sixth most expensive street with an average property price of £4,685,000.

Outside London, the most expensive streets are in Surrey, Hertfordshire and Kent. They include Woodlands Road West in Virginia Water (£3,201,000), Leys Road in Leatherhead (£3,018,000), The Ridgeway in Radlett (£2,368,000) and Phillippines Shaw in Sevenoaks (£2,250,000).

Several exclusive addresses are along the south coast, including Brudenell Avenue in Canford Cliffs (£1,975,000), Mudeford in Christchurch (£1,665,000) Panorama Road (£1,641,000) and Chaddesley Glen both in Sandbanks (£1,599,000).

The most expensive streets outside southern England are Park Lane in Trafford (£2,109,000); followed by Withinlee Road in Macclesfield (£1,649,000) and Thorsway in West Kirby. In Newcastle, Graham Park Road is the most expensive with an average price of £1,124,000; whilst on Church Street in Worcester a property commands an average price of £1,117,000. Yorkshire’s most expensive street is Rutland Drive in Harrogate (£1,109,000).

Nitesh Patel, economist at Lloyds TSB, said: “Kensington and Chelsea have some of the most expensive streets in England and Wales. The Royal Borough has been a highly fashionable area to live in for many decades. In recent years, its prime location in Central London and classical architecture has attracted affluent celebrities and ultra wealthy foreign businessmen, helping to drive up property prices. Across most regions, the most expensive streets are typically tightly clustered.”

Here’s a roundup of the rest of the results:

East Anglia
Seven of the 10 most expensive streets in East Anglia are in Cambridge. Most of these streets are close to the main University area (particularly around the Botanic Gardens) in the CB2 postal district. The most expensive streets are Sedley Taylor Road with an average house price of £1,147,000 and Hills Road (£1,012,000).

East Midlands
Valley Road in the Nottingham suburb of West Bridgford is the most expensive street in the East Midlands with an average price of £811,000. Other expensive streets in the region include Golf Lane in Northampton (£810,000), Hazelwood Road in Belper (£791,000), Tinwell Road in Stamford (£759,000) and Belfry Lane in Northampton (£747,000).

North East
Many of the most expensive streets in the North East are in Newcastle, particularly in the areas of Jesmond and Gosforth. Graham Park Road is the most expensive with an average price of £1,124,000, followed by Darras Road (£849,429) and Oakfield Road (£793,000). Other streets include Castlereigh in Billingham (£756,000) and Westhouse Avenue in Durham (£944,000).

North West
The most expensive street outside southern England is Park Lane in Altrincham (£2,109,000); followed by Withinlee Road in Macclesfield (£1,649,000) and Thorsway in West Kirby (£1,584,000). Eight of the 10 most expensive streets in the North West are in areas south of Manchester, such as Macclesfield Road (£1,290,000) in Alderley Edge.

South East
Seven of the 10 most expensive streets in the South East are in Surrey. They include Woodlands Road West in Virginia Water (£3,201,000), Leys Road (£3,018,000) and Moles Hill both in Oxshott (£2,800,000). Outside Surrey, the South East’s most expensive streets are The Ridgeway in Radlett (£2,368,000) and Phillippines Shaw in Sevenoaks (£2,250,000).

South West
A place near the sea attracts many wealthy buyers. These include Brudenell Avenue in Canford Cliffs, which has an average property price of £1,975,000; followed by Mudeford in Chrischurch (£1,665,000), Panorama Road (£1,641,000), Chaddesley Glen both in Sandbanks (£1,599,000) and Restronguet Point in Truro (£1,572,000).

West Midlands
The two most expensive streets in the West Midlands are Church Street in Broadway, often known as the “Jewel of the Cotswolds” with an average property value of £1,117,000 and Quarry Park Road in Stourbridge (£1,015,000). There are two other streets with an average value of over £900,000: Rosemary Hill Road (£990,000) and Lovelace Avenue (£959,000.

Yorkshire and the Humber
The most expensive streets in Yorkshire and the Humber are all located in the area that makes up the “Golden Triangle” between Harrogate, Wetherby and north Leeds. The region’s most expensive streets are Rutland Drive in the spa town of Harrogate (£1,109,000) and Wigton Lane in North Leeds (£1,035,000). Other exclusive addresses include Queens Parade in Harrogate (£971,000), Bracken Park in Leeds (£934,000) and Gill Bank Road in Ilkley (£874,000).

Wales
The most expensive street in Wales is Druidstone Road in Cardiff with an average house price of £682,000; followed by Gannock Park in the village of Deganwy in Conwy (£636,000), Lake Road West in Cardiff (£636,000) and East Cliff in Pennard in Swansea (£608,000). Seven of the 10 most expensive streets in the Principality are in Cardiff and Swansea; the remaining two are, Llantrithyd Road in Cowbridge (£600,000) and Deganwy Quay in Conwy (£532,000).

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  • kmjunk

    hmmmm, how about an article on where I can find the cheapest streets in the UK that would be more useful to the 99% looking for a home. All this article does is show us that were the rich are concerned there is no recession.

  • Tom M

    Why would we want, or need, or care to know where “the most expensive places to buy a house in England and Wales” are?

    Please stop publishing irrelevant, useless, and indeed rather offensive features that could only possibly appeal to estate agents, tax-avoiding rich immigrants, and horrible Chelsea types.

  • http://twitter.com/stony_bloke stony bloke

    Try Burnley, if you fancy a challenge

  • susandb

    i may be the only person that thinks chelsea would be an awful place to live. it has a really tense atmosphere. full of people consumed with their own status and equality consumed with anxiety about losing it.


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