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Who knows where you live?

Alex Johnson

6de7a25b287dd08ee1100b1724a6226960a0384b 300x225 Who knows where you live?Direct Line Home Insurance has some research out today in which they claim 6.8 million people are living unofficially in UK homes, one half in rented accommodation but not listed on the tenancy agreement, the other half with someone who owns the home such as friends and family, but have not registered themselves as a resident. And a further 7.1 million are currently registered under the wrong address with banks, insurers, local councils, the DVLA and other key organisations. They’ve extrapolated this from a survey of around 2,000 people so a pinch of salt is probably needed but the survey does include some interesting statistics.

Of the key organisations holding old or incorrect address details for them, people put doctors and dentists at the head of the list, followed by DVLA/driving license, and then their bank. Around 2% of people even said their employer did not have their correct address and 3% that the Inland Revenue were similarly in the dark.

“There are many reasons why someone may have not updated all their details,” said Jenny Trueman, home insurance manager at Direct Line. “The most common cause is moving home which can be stressful and extremely time consuming. Changing address details is one of those administrative tasks that is frequently put-off or forgotten. However, the consequences of using the wrong address are far worse than a few lost letters – people risk being fined by the DVLA, losing highly sensitive financial information from their bank and invalidating their home insurance.”

So what addresses are people using? The most popular choice – as stated by 44 per cent – was their parent’s address, slightly higher for those aged 18-34 years (54%). However, 38 per cent of those aged 35-54 still use their parent’s address for key registrations. Details of a previous property (34%) and an ex partner’s address (11%) were also cited, closely followed by a university address (9%) and previous employer’s address details (7%).

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  • http://www.guardian.co.uk/discussion/user-comments/makempsownup MakeMPsOwnUp

    What does “living unofficially in…” mean?

    But then another Indy piece of advertorial so who cares in the end.

  • hectorsmum

    Having tried with difficulty to inform various organisation that we have moved, I am not really surprised,

  • http://twitter.com/jlbprimary John Bell

    So the normal practice of MPs during the last Fraudsters’ Parliament is spreading?

    I humbly ask!

  • Onmebike

    Judging from the heap of junk mail on the mat just about everyone knows my address.

  • charliegrove

    Why on earth should we tell the state etc where we live?

    The people who need to know where to find me know where to find me. Intrusive sods who have no need to know have, however strong their interest, no chance of being within the last few addresses.

    It’s the right of every citizen to go through their life without being harassed by the state. Any state which forgets that deserves to be overthrown.

  • Sally

    You don’t have to have piles of junk mail on your mat. Just return it (and the envelope it came in) in the postage prepaid return envelope provided. Add some extra weight for emphasis, if you like (I know someone who saves roofing shingle pieces just for this purpose. Pure evil.). Works a treat. So what if your return address is not anywhere on the returned paper. If enough people do this then chances are, business will realize that the costs outweigh the potential sales, and they will stop. Even if there is no prepaid return envelope, you can always just scribble “return to sender” across the front and let RM fling it back from whence it came.

    I recently had one bundle come through the door and returned it in the prepaid envelope with a note, unsigned, of course. I used to have a flood of it, now it’s only a trickle. I almost look forward to it, actually. There is something wickedly satisfying about making them pay for getting it tossed back at them.

  • Waltermorgan

    I always restrict address details to those who need to know for my benefit not theirs. Likewise name and date of birth. All this information can be used as the building blocks of identity fraud and sometimes it’s just none of anyone’s damn business. Throw all junk mail and speculative “personalised” sales rubbish back in the pillar box or if the offenders have a high steet shop take it back to them.

  • ColostomyTempleton

    I think it means your Mom and Dad aren’t married or you Havant got a buthsertificat

  • http://www.guardian.co.uk/discussion/user-comments/makempsownup MakeMPsOwnUp

    Since 1926 and the passing of the Legitimacy Act the unmarked status of siring parents has been officially recognised. So it must only be the lack of a scrap of paper that da Indy must derfur refer to in this nonsense advertorial.


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